New Medtronic CareLink Reports!

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Last week, Medtronic revealed their new CareLink CGM reports.  I had always wanted access to the same reports that my endocrinologist reviews but never thought to ask Medtronic to make them available.  I’m glad others did because Medtronic said they received many requests for these reports.  Medtronic released a blog post about the new reports that you can check out here.

When you logon Medtronic Carelink’s website, it takes you directly to the Pro reports page.  This is what you see when you first log on:

Screen Shot 2016-04-25 at 8.27.31 AM

First, you select the period for which you want to run the reports, choosing from 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months or custom.  Next, you select the reports, which is broken down into two sections.  The top section is called “Bundles”.  In it, you can choose from 5 bundles, where if you click “Add to list”, they select several of the single reports in the section below:

Screen Shot 2016-04-25 at 8.29.03 AM

If you run the Daily Detail report, you will also need to select the dates you want to look at.  You can choose either the Bundles or the individual reports. For example, if you select the “How can I view my progress and trends” report, it will select the Dashboard & Episode Summary report and the Sensor & Meter Overview Report:

Screen Shot 2016-04-25 at 8.30.46 AM

The other bundles select the following reports:

How does mealtime affect my glucose levels? Report:

  • Dashboard & Episode Summary report
  • Sensor & Meter Overview report
  • Logbook report

What causes my highs and lows throughout the day? Report:

  • Dashboard & Episode Summary report
  • Sensor & Meter Overview report

What if I only wear the pump and no sensor? Report:

  • Adherence report
  • Sensor & Meter Overview report
  • Logbook report
  • Device Settings Snapshot report
  • Daily Detail report

What are my pump settings? Report:

  • Device Settings Snapshot

You can also add any and all single reports that you want but can only select on bundle at a time.

Once you select which reports (and dates) you want, you click the Generate Reports button at the top right. I admit that the first time I downloaded the reports, I was pretty overwhelmed with the unfamiliarity of the reports.  There is a lot of info on the reports and it’s not presented as user friendly as the old reports.  However, once I reviewed the reports a little more closely, I really appreciated the access to the data.

The first report is the Therapy Management Dashboard.  I like this report because I love data.  It packs a lot of data.  The 24-hour analysis is so helpful.  Looking at the report, I can see that I might need to change my insulin to carb ratio for dinner because I don’t tend to come down after eating.  The report shows how many carbs I eat per day and how many I average per meal.  The report also shows my basal/bolus ratio and how many corrections I do, how many times I override and how many sensor alarms I have per day.  All of this data is very informative and helps to make changes to improve my care. At the bottom of the report, there is also an “Action Plan” section and mine is blank.  Since I haven’t seen others, I’m wondering if there is normally anything written there by the software or if it’s just for doctors to put notes for the patients.

Therapy Management Dashboard

Therapy Management Dashboard

The second report is the Episode Summary. While the first report had data that was available in the old reports, this report presents data in a completely new way.  It shows the hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic episodes by preceding event type.  The report says its for Healthcare Professionals Only and it’s interesting to note that the different event types give recommendations.  For instance, my high blood sugar or hyperglycemic episodes occur 67% of the time from bolusing for food using the bolus wizard.  The software recommends accurate carb counting (something I sometimes slack on) and/or changing the timing of my insulin delivery (pre-bolusing, which I also need to work on).  I really like the software’s reviews and recommendations  The report also has an “Other Observations” section and my report recommended that I change my infusion site more frequently, which I just admitted in my Confessions post I tend to slack on-caught!

Episode Summary

Episode Summary

The third report is the Adherence report.  I’ve actually seen this report before at my doctor’s office before.  It doesn’t provide a ton of actionable data but it does show manual bolus events and override events which I think is important for me to see how much I trust my basal and bolus rates.  In the past, I haven’t trusted my rates and I’ve tended to override them, instead of using the bolus wizard.  When I don’t see many manual boluses or overrides, I can feel more confident that my rates are correct or that I can make changes to my rates correctly.

Adherence Report

Adherence Report

The next report is the Sensor & Meter Overview report.  The first page of this report was actually presented in the first report, the Therapy Management Dashboard but it’s a little easier to read on this report.

Sensor & Meter Overview-Page 1 of 3

Sensor & Meter Overview-Page 1 of 3

The second page of the report has similar information as the first page, but it’s presented a little differently, showing differently diamonds for if you are within range or not.

Sensor & Meter Overview, page 2 of 3

Sensor & Meter Overview-Page 2 of 3

The third page of the report, shows much more detail and by day.  It shows what the actual blood sugar finger pricks are and the boluses and basal for each day.  While this information is great, I find the first two reports a little better for taking action on changes to basal/bolus rates.

Sensor & Meter Overview-Page 3 of 3

Sensor & Meter Overview-Page 3 of 3

The Logbook report packs even more information.  I like this report because you can see the different times you bolus and shows the carbs with the blood sugars and color codes it as well, yellow for high and red for low.  But overall, it’s almost too much information presently all together.  Of all the reports listed so far, this is my least favorite but I appreciate the information that’s there.

Logbook

Logbook

The Device Settings Snapshot report shows what all of your settings are.  I won’t bore you with sharing this but it’s basically most of the information you can see in your pump under the bolus wizard settings and sensor settings.  This report is good if you want to make changes to some rates and you want to see what your settings are currently before actually going in and changing the settings.

Finally, there is the Daily Detail report.  This report is an in-depth look at each individual day that feeds into the reports above.  I like being able to see this information but I’d probably use one of the earlier reports for making changes.

Daily Detail Report

Daily Detail Report

Overall, I’m very happy with access to these reports.  I was definitely overwhelmed the first time I downloaded the reports, but now that I’ve done it a few times and I’m getting more comfortable with reading and analyzing the data. I’m glad to be able to see what the doctors look at.  I’ve heard a few people complain about how small the font is and how difficult it is to read and while I agree it’s pretty small, there is so much data presented, it would be hard to have the font/data much bigger.  Oh and if you don’t want to use the new reports, you can sill find the original reports at the bottom of the page:

Original CareLink reports at the bottom!

Original CareLink reports at the bottom!


2 thoughts on “New Medtronic CareLink Reports!

  1. Kelley, Thank you so much for useful information. I was a little confuse when I download my reports last sunday. This helps me a lot.

  2. I am so glad that these reports are now available to us!

    I have to tell you, it was a little intimidating to directly ask the panel of Medtronic execs for this access when I was at their forum this month — and then after getting a circuitous answer, to interrupt and ask again, this time more directly.

    But these are the things that need to be said and to be heard. There’s lots of requests from the patient community, some of which is valid and some which is superficial or unrealistic -but lumped together it’s all becomes noise and it doesn’t get noticed. Don’t be afraid to speak up and speak to the right people; sometimes the real challenge is getting the idea heard and validated, not in the implementation. And once you get heard, your voice becomes more respected.

    (With that said, I believe they must have already had this in the works – I doubt my question prompted a weeklong flurry of activity!)

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